Achilles was all broken after he got hit by a car…

Achilles, a 4 year old, 10 pound Yorkie, was hit by a car. His pelvis was broken in multiple places. The main issues were a fracture of the ileum (the bone in the front of the pelvis – red arrows) and a Sacro-Iliac luxation (aka SI luxation – blue arrows).

An SI luxation is a dislocation between the pelvis and the spine. Both injuries needed to be repaired surgically. There were several other fractures in the pelvis, which did not need surgery. In addition, there were multiple soft tissue injuries, meaning mostly damage to the muscles around the pelvis.

I was called to put Achilles back together at the Animal Clinic of Morris Plains in NJ.

The fracture was repaired with a metal plate and 6 screws. The dislocation was repaired with 1 pin and 1 screw (see postop X-ray).

After surgery, Achilles will need to rest very strictly for 2 months. This will allow all of the fractures, repaired and unrepaired, to heal nicely.

This is sadly a common story. Dogs often jump out of a car, run out of a yard, chase cars, follow their instincts (often due to hormones) etc. In the end, the car always wins. Please keep your cats and dogs safe. A leash is the easiest way to avoid many problems.

 

Phil Zeltzman, DVM, DACVS, CVJ, Fear Free Certified

 

When loving pet owners hurt their pet – badly

WARNING !!! This blog post is not for the faint of heart!!!

Of course you’ve heard of a pet who got hit by a car.

How about about a pet hit by his or her owner?

Do you find this shocking?

Do you think that this could never ever happen to you?

You’d be surprised how often this happens. It actually happens all the time! I fix these patients up regularly. They occasionally have what we call soft tissue injuries: to the lungs, the intestine or the skin. 

Most of the time, they have orthopedic injuries, i.e. broken bones, often in the pelvis. 

Sadly, some pets never make it…

How does it happen?

Occasionally, it happens when “pet meets car,” for example when a dog runs to greet his owner. 

Most of the time, it happens because the pet (cat or dog), sleeps under the car. And as you can imagine, the owner who is about to back up never suspects that their pet is sleeping under their car. 

So this is a reminder to never assume.

Always make sure you know where your pets are before you drive away.